Topics

Content edit forms


In This Guide

Customizing content edit forms

You can create a customized content edit form for a particular content type, and then assign the form to a role or role-site combination. This feature is useful when you want to show or hide certain widgets or fields depending on a user’s role, or if you want to make some widgets or fields read-only. For example, for articles, you can have one version of the content edit form without the Overrides widget for your users in the reporter role, and another version of the form that includes the Overrides widget for your SEO administrators.


Creating a custom content edit form

  1. Click menu > Admin > Users & Roles

    Content-Form-Dropdown.png

  2. In the Content Forms widget, select the content type for which you want to create a customized content edit form, and then click New. The New Content Form widget appears.
  3. In the Name field, type a name for the form.
  4. From the Scope list, select one of the following:

    • None—The customized content form is the default for all roles to which it is assigned.
    • Global—The customized content form is the global default for all roles, replacing the one automatically generated by Brightspot.
  5. From the Accesses list, select read or write access for all tabs and fields on the form. (This setting applies to the entire form; you can override this setting at the tab and field levels in the following steps.)
  6. To customize a tab and its fields, do the following:

    1. Click the tab field to expand it. A form appears with the tab’s name, access level, and fields.

      tabs-custom-content-edit-form.png

    2. In the Name field, type a name for the tab.
    3. From the Access list, and using the table Access options table as a reference, select one of the access options.
    4. To hide a visible field, drag it to the Hidden Items list. (Don’t hide a field that is required in the default content edit form.)
    5. To show a hidden field, drag it to the Visible Items list.
    6. To reorder visible items, drag them to the required position.
  7. To change a field’s name or access level, do the following:

    1. Click the field. A form appears.

      field-form-content-edit-form.png

    2. In the Name field, type a name for the field.
    3. From the Access list, and using the table Access options table as a reference, select one of the access options.
  8. Group fields within the tab by doing the following:

    1. Under Clusters, click Add Group. A Group form appears.

      group-form.png

    2. In the Name field, type a name for the group.
    3. From the Access list, and using the table Access options table as a reference, select one of the access options.
    4. From the Fields list, drag fields into the group and in the desired order.
  9. To change the placement of a widget on the content edit form:

    1. Click the widget field to expand it.

      widget-placement.png

    2. From the Placement list, select one of the placement options.
  10. Click Save.

Showing, hiding, and reordering field items

To show, hide, or reorder field items:

  1. Hide a visible tab by dragging it to the Hidden Items list. (Don’t hide tabs containing fields that are required in the default content edit form.)
  2. Show a hidden tab by dragging it to the Visible Items list.
  3. Reorder the visible tabs by dragging them to the required position.
  4. Change the placement of widgets on the content edit form (described below).

Renaming a field item

To rename a field name:

  1. Click the field. A form appears:

    field-form-content-edit-form.png

  2. In the Name field, type a name for the field.
  3. Click Save.

Limiting access on a field item

To limit access on a field item:

  1. From the Access dropdown, and using the table below as a reference, select one of the access options.
Custom Site Widget Inheritance.png

Access optionTab levelGroup levelField level
InheritedFields in the tab have the same read and write access as the default form for the content type.Fields in the group have the same read and write access as the containing tab.Field has the same read and write access as the containing group or tab.
Read OnlyFields in the tab have read-only access.Fields in the group have read-only access.Field has read-only access.
Read & WriteFields in the tab have read and write access.Fields in the group have read and write access.Field has read and write access.

Adding a new tab to the content edit form

To add a new tab to the content edit form:

  1. Under Visible Items, click add_circle_outline and select Tab. A Tab form appears.
  2. In the Name field, type a name for the tab.
  3. From the Access list, and using the table Access Options as a reference, select one of the access options.
  4. Repeat steps 1–3 to add additional tabs.

Modifying a custom content edit form

To modify a custom content edit form:

  1. Click menu > Admin > Sites & Settings. The Content Forms widget appears on the left side of the page.
  2. Select the form you want to modify. Brightspot displays the form in the Edit Content Form widget.
  3. Modify the form; see Customizing content edit forms for details.
  4. Click Save.

Deleting a custom content edit form

To delete a custom content edit form:

  1. Click menu > Admin > Sites & Settings.The Content Forms widget appears on the left side of the page.
  2. Select the form you want to delete. The Edit Content Form widget appears.
  3. At the bottom of the widget, click Delete Permanently.

Content Edit Form hierarchy

Brightspot generates default content edit forms based on the fields in the underlying content type. For example, if an article has fields for headline, author, body, and image, the default content edit form for articles displays those four fields. Whenever you create a new article, you see the default content edit form.

You can display different versions of content edit forms based on an editor’s role or role-site combination. Referring to the following diagram, when creating a new article—

  • An editor not assigned to any role sees the form’s default version with four fields.
  • An editor assigned to the role Contributor sees the version with three fields.
  • An editor assigned to the role Contributor and working on the site aliens.com sees the version with two fields.
default-and-custom-content-edit-forms.svg

The following sections describe how to create custom content edit forms and then assign them to roles and role-site combinations.


Assign custom content edit forms to a role

Assigning a custom content edit form to a role makes that form the default for that role for that content type. Referring to the illustration in Content edit form hierarchy, when you assign a three-field form to the role Contributor, all users with that role see that form when working on articles.

You can override a role’s default content edit form at the site level. For example, in the illustration in Content edit form hierarchy, editors with the role Contributor working on the site aliens.com see the two-field form when working on articles.

To assign a custom content edit form to a role or role-site combination:

  1. Click menu > Admin > Users & Roles. The Roles widget appears on the left side of the page.
  2. Select the role to which you want to assign the form. The Edit Tool Role widget appears.
  3. To assign a custom content edit form to a role, do the following:
    1. From the Types list, select All Except. A form appears with Excluded Types and Restricted Types.
      Assign CEF to role - select types
    2. Skip to step 7.
  4. To assign a custom content edit form to a role-site combination, under Site Specific Permissions, click add_circle_outline. A form appears.
    Assign CEF to role - select permissions
  5. From the Sites list, select the sites with which you want to associate the custom content edit form.
  6. From the Types list, select All Except. A form appears with Excluded Types and Restricted Types.
    Assign CEF to role - restricted types
  7. In Restricted Types, click add_circle_outline and select Content Type. A form appears.
  8. From the Types list, select a content type.
  9. From the Form list, select the customized content edit form associated with the content type you selected in step 8. (If your select Default, the role sees the default content edit form for the selected content type.)
  10. To restrict additional content types that apply to all sites, repeat steps 7–9.
  11. To restrict additional content types for specific sites, repeat steps 4–10.
  12. Click Save.

When you assign a custom content edit form to a role or role-site combination, or if you change the default content edit form, the form’s name appears in the Create list in the search panel and in the Quick Start widget. For example, you created a custom content edit form Simplified Article for the role Junior Editor. The junior editors see Simplified Article in the Quick Start widget, and other editors see Article.

Quick start widget - default content edit form
Quick start widget - custom content edit form

Field types and their components

Brightspot’s content edit form has different types of fields for entering different types of data. You’re probably familiar with many of these fields—such as text fields or date pickers—from other sites you visit on the Internet.

Text

Text fields allow for entering a single line of text. Headlines, photo credits, copyright dates, and attributions are examples of single-line text fields. The following illustration is an example of a text field with a note providing a cue about how to write a headline.

Text field type

Rich-text editor

Rich-text editors serve as a small word processor. You can add formatting and media in rich-text editors, such as boldface, italics, images, and hyperlinks. You usually use a rich-text editor to compose content such as body text, author biographies, headers, and footers.

Rich Text Field

Selection field

Selection fields provide suggested values for a field. For example, a selection field for authors lists some of the authors in Brightspot.

Selection field showing current selection
Selection field showing current selection
Selection field showing available items
Selection field showing available items

Selection fields typically have three controls:

  • search— Opens the content picker. If the selection field doesn’t show the item you need, you can find the item using the content picker.
  • edit— Opens a content edit form for editing the current selection.
  • remove—Removes the current selection.

Date selector

Date selectors help you easily select a date and time. You usually use a date selector for setting fields such as scheduled dates, embargo dates, and review dates.

Date Selector FIeld

File selector

File selectors provide a way to include a file, such as an image, document, or media, into your content.

There are two ways to include a file in Brightspot:

  • New Upload Selecting this option in a file selector displays a Choose button. When you click on this button, you can navigate to the file on your computer. Brightspot uploads and saves the image.
  • New URL Selecting this option in a file selector displays a text field for pasting a URL. Brightspot saves the URL, not the actual file.
Uploading a file from your computer
Uploading a file from your computer
Referring to a file with a URL
Referring to a file with a URL

After you select the file, Brightspot displays a preview in the content edit form.

Toggle

Toggles provide answers to yes-or-no questions. Many settings in your profile are toggles, such as returning to the dashboard after saving an item.

Toggle in no position
Toggle in no position
Toggle in yes position
Toggle in yes position

List

Lists contain one or more items of the same content type, such as one or more authors.

List Field

Lists have two controls:

  • add_circle_outline — Displays a field for adding another item to the list. Many fields in a list are selection fields.
  • remove— Removes the item from the list.
Note
All the fields described in this section change color as you modify them.


Shared vs. one-off assets

The terms “shared” and “one-off” indicate if an asset can be reused.

  • Shared assets are available for reuse; they can appear in more than one parent asset.
  • One-off assets are not available for reuse; they appear in only a parent asset.

Corporate logos are a common example of a shared asset: brand storytelling almost mandates that corporate logos be identical wherever they appear in a site. Other examples of shared assets include the following:

  • Images that appear in more than one article
  • Reporters cited in more than one news story
  • Page layouts appearing in more than one section

The following diagrams illustrate the difference between shared and one-off.

Shared vs. One Off Assets
One-Off Image Example

Referring to the diagram on the left, the image of kneading dough is generic, so it is a good candidate to appear in the three blog posts. If you change the image or its caption, the change appears in all three blog posts. In addition, when editors search for images using the keyword kneading, Brightspot displays the image in the search results.

Referring to the diagram on the right, the celebrant is describing a one-time event that included a one-time dessert. The chances of editors using the image in other blog posts are low, so it is a good candidate to add it to Brightspot as a one-off asset. In addition, when editors search for images using the keyword birthday, Brightspot does not include the image in the search results.

Summary:

  • Add assets to Brightspot as shared when—
    • You want them to be available for use in multiple parent assets.
    • You want their updates to appear in the parent assets.
  • Add assets to Brightspot as one-off when—
    • You believe they are not pertinent to more than one parent asset.
    • You do not want them to be available in other parent assets.
    • You want to prevent automatic updates from appearing in the parent asset.

Use the selection field for shared assets

When you create an asset, you often include shared assets that are already in Brightspot. For example, when creating an article, you can include an existing author, image, section, and tag. Similarly, when creating a gallery, you can include an existing photographer and images.

To select a shared asset:

When you create an asset, the content edit form often includes a selection field for selecting a shared asset.

selection-field.svg

When you open a selection field, Brightspot lists all the assets with the following characteristics:

  • They are of the associated content type (such as author, section, or tag)
  • They are available to you or the site on which you are working

Brightspot then lists the assets in the following groups:

  • The first group contains the five shared assets that you or another editor most recently selected, sorted by time selected.
  • The second group contains the 20 shared assets that you or another editor most recently updated, sorted by time updated.
  • The third group contains all other available assets, sorted alphabetically.

Each group is sorted alphabetically.

shared selection field authors.png

If a shared asset you need does not appear in the selection field, review the following table for causes and resolutions.

Cause

Resolution

More assets are available than what appears in the selection field.

Click search to open the content picker, and search for the asset.

You don’t have permission to use the shared asset.

Ask an editor who is an owner of the asset to give you permission.

The asset does not exist.

Click search to open the content picker, and create the required asset.



Inline editing

When you click a URL in the URLs widget, Brightspot displays the item in your browser—along with the inline editor.

Brightspot inline editor.svg

(If you don’t see the inline editor, you may need to change your profile settings.

There is an inline editor for each item used to render the page, including embedded items. For example, if you have an article that contains an author item and an image item, Brightspot displays three inline editors, one for each item.

Clicking the inline editor opens the content edit form for the corresponding item.


Toggling full-screen editing

You can expand the rich-text editor so that it occupies your entire browser window—a useful feature if you are writing a long article or if there are many tracked changes and comments. The following illustration is an example of the rich-text editor in full-screen mode.

Full screen editing.png

To toggle full-screen editing:

  • On the toolbar, click fullscreen.